header image Professor Hakim Dilshad Hussain Tabssum (Gold Medalist) Ex-member: American Infertility Association (USA)
 
 

Vagina & problem

Vagina-problem
 what is vaginal , functions , vaginal Disease and herbal taretment  ?

Vaginas are designed to help us have and enjoy sex, have periods and have babies. But what’s normal and                                                                      what’s not? Find out how vaginas can be different.

1. Some of a woman’s sexual organs are inside the body (such as the womb, ovaries and vagina) and some are outside. The external organs are known as the vulva. This includes the opening of the vagina, the inner and outer lips (labia) and the clitoris, which is located at the top of the vagina.

2. The vagina is a tube about 8cm (3in) long, which leads from the cervix (the neck of the womb) down to the vulva, where it opens between the legs. The vagina is very elastic so it can easily stretch around a man’s penis or around a baby during labour.

3.The vagina is an elastic, muscular canal with a soft, flexible lining that provides lubrication and sensation. The vagina connects the uterus to the outside world. The vulva and labia form the entrance, and the cervix of the uterus protrudes into the vagina, forming the interior end.

4.The vagina receives the penis during sexual intercourse and also serves as a conduit for menstrual flow from the uterus. During childbirth, the baby passes through the vagina (birth canal).

5. The hymen is a thin membrane of tissue that surrounds and narrows the vaginal opening. It may be torn or ruptured by sexual activity or by exercise.

Vaginal disease ,care and Herbal treatment

 1. Child birth   2. Chlamydia Infections   3.Genital Herpes   4.HPV    5. Leucorrhoea    6.Syphilis   7.Trichomoniasis    8.Vaginal Bleeding   

9.Vaginal Cancer   10. Vaginal Diseases   11. Vulvar Cancer     12.Yeast Infections    13. Gonorrhea    14.Vaginal itching

 

 1. Child birth 

When you are ready to have your baby, you’ll go through labor. Contractions let you know labor is starting. When contractions are five minutes apart, your body is ready to push the baby out.During the first stage of labor, your cervix slowly opens, or dilates, to about 4 inches wide. At the same time, it becomes thinner. This is called effacement. You shouldn’t push until your uterus is fully effaced and dilated. When it is, the baby delivery stage starts. Crowning is when your baby’s scalp comes into view. Shortly afterward, your baby is born. The placenta that nourished the baby follows.Mothers and babies are monitored closely during labor. Most women are healthy enough to have a baby through normal vaginal delivery, meaning that the baby comes down the birth canal without surgery. If there are complications, the baby may need to be delivered surgically by a Cesarean section
 
2. Chlamydia Infections

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. You can get chlamydia during oral, vaginal, or anal sex with an infected partner. Both men and women can get it.Chlamydia usually doesn’t cause symptoms. If it does, you might notice a burning feeling when you urinate or abnormal discharge from your vagina or penis.In both men and women, chlamydia can infect the urinary tract. In women, infection of the reproductive system can lead to pelvic pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID can cause infertility or serious problems with pregnancy. Babies born to infected mothers can get eye infections and pneumonia from chlamydia. In men, chlamydia can infect the epididymis, the tube that carries sperm. This can cause pain, fever, and, rarely, infertility. A lab test can tell if you have chlamydia. Antibiotics will cure the infection. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading chlamydia. Experts recommend that sexually active women 25 and younger get a chlamydia test every year.

3. Genital Herpes

Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on your genital or rectal area, buttocks, and thighs. You can get it from having sex, even oral sex. The virus can spread even when sores are not present. Mothers can also infect their babies during childbirth. Symptoms of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near the area where the virus has entered the body. They turn into blisters, become itchy and painful, and then heal. Sometimes people do not know they have herpes because they have no symptoms or very mild symptoms. The virus can be more serious in newborn babies or in people with weak immune systems. Most people have outbreaks several times a year. Over time, you get them less often and the symptoms become milder. The virus stays in your body for life. Medicines do not cure genital herpes, but they can help your body fight the virus. This can help lessen symptoms, decrease outbreaks, and lower the risk of passing the virus to others. Correct usage of latex condoms can reduce, but not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading herpes.
 
 4. HPV
 
Human papillomaviruses  (HPV) are common viruses that can cause warts. There are more than 100 types of HPV. Most are harmless, but about 30 types put you at risk for cancer. These types affect the genitals and you get them through sexual contact with an infected partner. They can be either low-risk or high-risk. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High-risk HPV can lead to cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, and anus in women. In men, it can lead to cancers of the anus and penis. Although some people develop genital warts from HPV infection, others have no symptoms. Your health care provider can treat or remove the warts. In women, Pap smears can detect changes in the cervix that might lead to cancer. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading HPV. Vaccines can protect against several types of HPV, including some that can cause cancer.
 
 

1 2 3 4